Blood Pressure

[see also Cardiovascular Plaque, Heart Disease, Stroke, Memory]

Higher Folate Intake Decreased Risk For High Blood Pressure 1 (Read Article...)
Women who get large amounts of the vitamin folate from food and supplements have a sharply lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to researchers from Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in a study of 150,000 women. Women age 27-44 who consumed at least 1,000 micrograms of folate per day were 46% less likely to develop hypertension than women who consumed less than 200 micrograms. Women 43-70 saw a less pronounced yet significant 18% reduced risk of high blood pressure after consuming 1,000 micrograms of folate each day. (Read Article...) 
Healthy homocysteine levels can be maintained with a combination of Folate, B12 and B6. The body-ready (conenzymated) form of these vitamins may help overcome obstacles to metabolizing homocysteine.
Elevated Blood Pressure Addressed With Folate 2
Publisher's abstract: Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2003 Dec;43(12):1299-306
Elevated homocysteine diminishes the ability of nitric oxide to dilate blood vessels, stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, alters the elastic properties of blood vessel walls, and increases oxidative stress. Subsequently, it is believed homocysteine contributes to elevated blood pressure. Correcting high homocysteine levels with folate, vitamins B12 and B6 could be a useful therapy for addressing hypertension say the authors.

Disturbed Folate Metabolism May Play Role In Early States Of Hypertension 3
Publisher's abstract: American Journal of Hypertension. 2002 Oct;15(10 Pt 1):857-64
Essential hypertension in adolescents is associated with lower folate and higher homocysteine levels, and with signs of insulin resistance. Data suggests that hypertension in young individuals may be a part of early manifestation of insulin resistance syndrome, and that disturbed folate and homocysteine metabolism may play a role in the early stages of hypertension.

Notes
  • Additional studies are underway to further demonstrate whether folate intake or lowering homocysteine levels have a consistent direct, causal role in lowering blood pressure or a consistent ability to reduce risk for hypertension.
  • Intake of more than 1000 mcg/day of folate can hide symptoms of B12 deficiency. A blood test can measure serum B12, or see if methylmalonic acid is elevated as a proxy for functional B12 shortage. Oral supplementation with 1000 mcg/day of B12 corrects or protects against most cases of deficiency (except those due to metabolic or serious malabsorption issues). If untreated, B12 deficiency can result in nerve damage.
  • This article is not intended to replace the advice or attention of your doctor or other health care professional. Do not stop taking medications or start taking any nutrition supplement without first speaking to a qualified health care professional.
References

1John P. Forman, MD; Eric B. Rimm, ScD; Meir J. Stampfer, MD, DrPH; Gary C. Curhan, MD, ScD. Folate Intake and the Risk of Incident Hypertension Among US Women. JAMA. 2005;293:320-329.

2 Rodrigo R; Passalacqua W; Araya J; Orellana M; Rivera G. Homocysteine and essential hypertension. J Clin Pharmacol 2003 Dec;43(12):1299-306.

3 Kahleova R; Palyzova D; Zvara K; Zvarova J; Hrach K; Novakova I; Hyanek J; Bendlova B; Kozich V. Essential hypertension in adolescents: association with insulin resistance and with metabolism of homocysteine and vitamins. Am J Hypertens 2002 Oct;15(10 Pt 1):857-64.










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Articles published in this reading room are not intended to replace the advice or attention of your doctor
or other health care professional. Do not stop taking medications, begin a diet or exercise program,
or start taking a nutrition supplement without first speaking to a qualified health care professional.